Amadeus


also produced at Geva,  2010



“Mr Barnes and Bill Clarke, his scenic designer , have made immensely resourceful use of the thrust stage of the 763-seat theater......The handsome but  spare set leaves ample room for the 18 actors to strut their stuff unimpeded with unnecessary scenery....”

-Terry Teachout, Wall Street Journal


“Bill Clarke’s smart scenic design works economically to evoke the period.”

-Chris Gibson, Broadway World


“Bill Clarke’s set looks and works well with the sizable and frequently bustling cast.”

-Robert Boyd, Talkin’ Broadway


“A marble floor and imposing gold drape flanked by a series of imposing glass doors on either side are the focus of Bill Clarke's ornate set design....”

-Mark Bretz, The Ladue News


“The set is both simple and opulent and also versatile...Technically and visually, the show is nearly perfect.”

-Andrea Braun, The Vital Voice


“ ....set designer Bill Clarke....help(s) stretch the bounds of the stage....visually.”

-Judith Newmark, St. Louis Post-Dispatch


“With....a beautiful set by Bill Clarke....this production of Amadeus has more going for it than anything you may have seen on a St Louis stage in quite some time.”

-SFMteve Allen, KFUO-


“The set designs and costumes are sumptuous.”

-Harry Hamm, KMOX-AM


“Bill Clarke’s set, on an almost-bare stage, in heightened by mirrors at stage left and right, their ghostly reflections bringing an additional air of mystery.”

-Joe Pollack, St Louis Eats


“Bill Clarke’s set made good use of the thrust stage. It was mainly a long gold curtain bookended by tall mirrored panels. With varying pieces of furniture placed in front of them, they were all I needed to be transported back to the decadent Vienna of the Enlightenment.”

-Robert Strasser, KDHX-FM






Rep Theater of St Louis

Paul Barnes, director

2009


     

          

Prelim sketches

Opening. Translucent gold Austrian curtain flown in.

Salieri’s townhouse. Six black mylar panels can be individually  backlit.

Each of six side panels can be used as doors

Neues Schloss, Austria



Trap opens U.S. for Mozart’s burial.